Research: Acupuncture Adventures

If somebody told me years ago that I would get used to needles pricked all over my body, I would have laughed. Despite always being intrigued by health and wellness trends, my fear of those tiny daggers kept me away. About six years ago, however, when trying unsuccessfully to get pregnant, I was desperate to try all-natural methods. It was then that I was introduced to acupuncture.

Acupuncture is an Asian/Chinese modality that’s been around for thousands of years. Thin needles are positioned into certain points (meridians) on the body in an effort to balance the energy flow (chi) throughout. Oftentimes, each patient’s needs are assessed upon the initial visit with a full-body exam and blood work. Once the treatment begins, thin needles are tapped into various points on the skin from head to foot. Treatments last 15-45 minutes, depending on the practitioner. Acupuncture isn’t a one-time fix, follow-up visits are often suggested depending on the symptoms. Many acupuncturists are certified through the National Certification Commission of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM.) In addition, some doctors are integrating acupuncture into their practices and can be certified through the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture (AAMA.)

Book Review: ‘Thrive’ by Arianna Huffington

I was proud to be a laser-focused workaholic.

I used to boast about my multi-tasking skills. I even went so far as to connect my work computer to my elliptical with a bungee cord so I could read emails and trade publications while exercising.

I remember bragging to a top-executive that I only slept three hours a night, so that I could exceed everyone’s expectations as a new mother and superstar employee.

I skimmed books, listened to podcasts and networked with many women about finding a way to “have it all.” Even when I changed my career to focus on my family values, I was still conditioned to live a harried life. I scheduled my day from early morning to late evening and multi-tasked through much of it. Additionally, I felt like every item on my to-do list should be achieved with high merit.

I thought I was thriving because I was “successful” with a promising career and beautiful family. Oh, how I wish Arianna Huffington’s Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder would’ve been written 20 years ago when I started my first job and had to balance work and taking care of myself. Perhaps, I would’ve learned better habits to not just tackle life, but to truly enjoy it at every step a long the way.

A Quick Fix for Peace and Presence

Living on the shoreline for the past 10 years, I only occasionally saw the beauty of the beaches. I knew the sights were pretty, but was running too fast to appreciate the feeling of calmness they could bring to my life. Now, after a second cancer diagnosis, visiting Walnut Beach is one of my favorite pastimes. Just being around the shell-covered sand and glistening water brightens my day and teaches me to breathe, be in the present, and find peace in any situation.

The “old me” thought she knew peace. To her, peace of mind meant being successful in the workplace. Of course, for a working mother, that came with its own unique set of hurdles. But the old me didn’t see those hurdles as negatives. Instead, she looked at them as opportunities to become even more successful.