BEGIN TYPING YOUR SEARCH ABOVE AND PRESS RETURN TO SEARCH. PRESS ESC TO CANCEL

Juice Shot Review: My Shot Glass Juice Journey

Does a shot a day keep the doctor away? Of course, I’m talking about green juices and vegetable derived liquids, not Jell-O or Jägermeister shots. In the spirit of taking small steps toward better health on my adventures in wellness, I explored adding wheatgrass and ginger shots to my diet. The findings were varied. Below captures some top-line information gathered on my review of these healthy shots.

Highlights from My Shot Glass Juice Journey

Juice Shot Review: My Shotglass Juice Journey

Wheatgrass:

I was introduced to wheatgrass shots almost two years ago. Honestly, the smell and initial sip felt like I chugged a pureed handful of grass from my front lawn. But, the bittersweet aftertaste was ok. I have found if I chase it with a glass of water or better yet a bite of an orange, it is doable. I didn’t notice any health-related changes when drinking a few shots a week. However, I did feel much better if I downed one on an empty stomach rather than after eating a meal.

1. Pros/Cons: 

In researching the benefits of wheatgrass shots, some highly credited health organizations including the Hippocrates Health Institute, believe wheatgrass shots to be an incredibly potent elixir. One ounce contains 103 vitamins, minerals and amino acids, giving this small drink a mighty large nutritious punch. In addition, the chlorophyll found in wheatgrass, creates an environment that curbs bacterial growth in the body and offsets ingested toxins. The shots enter the blood stream quickly and activate white blood cells boosting the body’s immune system. However, critics believe that the benefits of wheatgrass are largely biological and research is too limited. Sources also include: Metro, Mercola.org and WebMD.

2. My reality:

The media is hot on wheatgrass, so I didn’t want to miss out by not taking it. However, I didn’t feel any significant changes and truly couldn’t enjoy the taste. Drinking quality green juices, rather than wheatgrass shots, are easier to make at home and still provide several key nutrients. Wheatgrass is hard to find, so making shots at home would be more difficult and time-consuming. (Whole Foods and local farmer’s markets may carry it, but not conventional grocery stores.) In addition, a special juicer with a crank is needed, making it a pricey option. Therefore, if I opt for wheatgrass shots, I buy them at a local organic juice bar.

Ginger

I never cared for ginger snaps as a kid and got sick after my first sushi experience because of the ginger garnish. So, I stayed away from ginger shots, believing I would hate them. A few weeks ago, I tried one because I noticed many people ordering them at healthy cafes. Interestingly enough, I really enjoyed the tangy taste and felt a jolt of energy afterwards.

1. Pros/Cons:

Research shows that ginger has anti-inflammatory and anti-spasmodic properties so it can relieve pain and cramping. For someone that experiences allergies and colds often, ginger may help because it is an expectorant that breaks apart mucus. Also, ginger is popularly known for aiding with nausea. While I didn’t find many critics, I did read about potential side effects with drug interactions. As always, it is recommended that a doctor be aware of a change in diet for someone on medication. Sources include: Dr. Weil, Web MD and UCLA Center for East West Medicine.

2. My reality:

I liked the taste and felt great afterwards, so plan to add these a few times a week. Whole Foods and many grocery stores stock ginger, so it is easily accessible.  Also, making the two ounce shots are as simple as juicing it in my Breville. (I add a squeeze of lemon to it, as well.)

While I’ve seen many stories about wheatgrass and ginger being super foods to cure various ailments, my findings upon digging deeper resulted in Mother Nature (and my own mom – ugh) being right. Consuming an abundance of wholesome fruits and vegetables grown directly from the earth and in multiple forms (juices, smoothies, whole foods raw and cooked) are key to feeling vibrant and minimizing health issues. I do think Mother Nature would be satisfied with these healthy shots. She just wouldn’t count on them alone to heal all stormy ailments.

Have you ever tried juice shots? Would you consider knowing the health benefits?

Juice Shot Review: My Shotglass Juice Journey

 

4 Comments

  1. Thank you for this post (of course for all of them really)! I’ve been contemplating so many of these options, more of a quick-fix supplement idea. Making me very much re-think my strategy! Dang you moms and your common sense!

  2. Caryn Sullivan

    I feel a million times better eating/drinking fresh fruits and veggies versus taking vitamins. There is a lot of controversy in the media about vitamins…whether the body absorbs them correctly, whether the vitamins actually have the listed nutrients in them and whether our bodies actually need more than 100% daily recommended allowance of certain vitamins and minerals, etc. I had my blood taken at my doctor’s office (but it can also be done through a naturopath) and they can look at what your body actually needs and then recommend accordingly. Juicing takes some time, but I do feel great in the morning after drinking one. I also start the day with hot water and lemon, which is easy. It supposedly makes our body more alkaline after waking up with an empty stomach. xoxo

  3. Johnb474

    I conceive you have remarked some very interesting points , regards for the post. edcdadbeddgd

  4. Deliciously healthy! I’d love making some of these one time.

Leave a comment

Please be polite. We appreciate that. Your email address will not be published and required fields are marked